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UUFSD Directory Photos

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Every Sunday – 10:00 – 11:00 AM

Steve Bartram will be taking “Passport” type photos that will go into the UUFSD Directory. Simple black and white, no frills, smiles only pictures. There will be a camera on a tripod and an “X” for you to stand on. No children, just adults.

Here is a sample of our own Vicky Newman:

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Commit2Respond Goals & Events

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In 2015, UUs everywhere are being asked to be a part of Commit2Respond:
an initiative focused on climate change and climate justice.

Commit2Respond was inspired in large part by the success of Thirty Days of Love, and the question: What if we can bring together the UUSC, UUA, and UUs all over the country to work on one justice issue?

The goals of Commit2Respond are to:

1. Shift to a low carbon future.
2. Advance the human rights of affected communities;
3. grow the climate justice movement.

UUFSD will be joining C2R with a month of services, forums and events designed to educate, inspire and ultimately, act. Following is a list of planned activities.

  • March 22: “Have you Heard the Good News about Climate Change?“
  • March 29: How to Ignite a Movement — Great Lessons from great Leaders … Forum after service: The Science of “Climate Change and the Art of Citizen Response” – Dr. Lynne Talley and Marshall Saunders
  • April 12: Congregational Voices on Climate Change — 3 or 4 short talks on climate change from members of the Fellowship. Special Forum, 12:15 PM in Fellowship Hall The Climate Change Crisis and How We Can Solve It Together. Philip Petrie and Dwain Deets 350.org
  • April 13: Book Club is reading “The Sixth Extinction” by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • April 19: Voices from Affected … A moving service that reveals how climate change is hurting people already, told in their own words.
  • April 19: Save Your Life, Save the World: With a little help, design a sustainable dish that is kinder to the planet and better for you, then share it with each other. 5:30 PM

CJM-fb-iconDuring 30 Days of Commit2Respond you can share your goals, actions, and prayers for climate justice by posting to the Climate Action Board. You can view the board in Founder’s Hall from March 22 to April 22.

Events may be added and dates may change as we get closer – stay tuned.

April 2: Food Bank Volunteer Night

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Food Bank Volunteer Night – Thursday April 2

Join us at the San Diego Food Bank in the Miramar area; just 20 minutes from UUFSD! It’s always from 6:00 – 8:00 PManyone over 7 years old can help! Mostly we just put food in boxes on an assembly line or bag fresh produce – really easy, no lifting, no bending, great camaraderie.

Last month our team packed 16,200 lbs of food which equates to feeding 540 Seniors who need a bit extra each month – in just 2 hours! Each box contained a bag of beans, a box of pasta, a can of tomato sauce, a can of chicken and tuna, a bottle of juice and a box of cereal….If you let this sink in it’s hard to believe this sort of small portions is so needed by so many who live in our neighborhoods here in San Diego….we can’t solve the world problems but we can make a difference right here, right now, one small effort at a time.

This is a wonderful way of helping locally those in need and strengthening our UUFSD community as well. The San Diego Food Bank distributes over 20 million pounds of food annually to individuals, families and a network of nonprofit organizations that work to alleviate hunger throughout San Diego county. They need our help!

Email Sara Ohara TO REGISTER and for more information: sara@saraohara.com

Commit2Respond Day 7: Reckoning

In support of the 30 Days of Love/Commit2Respond – Climate Justice

Day 7

Today begins our week-long journey into grieving and reckoning with the losses we are facing as an Earth Community. We are reminded not only of our own mortality, but also of the mortality of the planet. We are asked to face boldly into the knowledge of what humankind has brought to pass in very short time as measured on a geological scale.

We are reminded to be attentive to the fact that some, by virtue of the many and various markers of a privileged socioeconomic status, can make the temporary choice of distancing themselves from the suffering born of environmental devastation. Let us choose instead to lean into our grief.

We are called to interrupt social norms that designate some species and peoples as disposable and to instead make life choices that promote climate justice. In this week of fire—an element of immediacy and urgency, whose spirit is considered both creator and destroyer of life—let us embrace our grief so that we might deepen the work of transformation.

Let us be bold truth tellers and passionate grievers, together.

Commit2Respond’s Climate Justice Month intends to take you through a transformative spiritual process leading to long-term commitments to climate justice. At the end of the month you will be asked to SHIFT to a low carbon future, ADVANCE human rights, and GROW the movement. Learn more and start thinking about how you will #commit2respond to climate change.

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Commit2Respond Day 6: Our Creation Story Speaks of Climate Change

In support of the 30 Days of Love/Commit2Respond – Climate Justice

Day 6

Long ago, the Great Spirit looked for a home for people, the Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe), and for all they would ever need. Out of nothing, that All Loving Spirit created the universe and solar system, including Mother Earth. When She was a cold, lifeless rock, the All Loving Spirit blew life into Her, causing Her to spin and support life.

From that time on, the All Loving Spirit sent spirit helpers to help get Earth ready for Anishinaabeg. Many parts of our Creation Story tell of the deeds accomplished by these spirit helpers. Ojibwe pre-Christian spirituality’s belief is in a singular Higher Power and many smaller spirits. It is with the smaller Spirits that much of the day to day spiritual work gets done. These smaller Spirits brought the gifts that make life possible, though all the gifts originate with the Great Spirit.

When Anishinaabe got here, they were given instructions to live by, including Honesty, Respect, Wisdom, Love, Humility, Bravery, and Truth. For thousands of generations, the Anishinaabeg kept it going.

At different times throughout the creation story, there are times of great change. There is mention of visitors coming to our homeland. More recently, Elders have spoken of a fire that will take many gifts of the creation from us. Early on, many thought it was nuclear weapons, others spoke of pollution. Others spoke of the life-giving ceremonial fire that has brought us through good times and bad, and of corruption of that life-giving fire. The Elders, and more, now realize our creation story was speaking of climate change.

The plants are confused, the animals are confused, the Anishinaabeg life ways are becoming increasingly endangered. There are no easy answers for any of this. Perhaps that time of great change is upon us.

Robert Shimek RRI is the Executive Director of the White Earth Land Recovery Project.

Today’s practice is to participate in Earth Hour, a global event of switching off all lights for one hour to focus attention on climate change (check out the inspiring official video). Earth Hour is TONIGHT from 8:30-9:30pm local time. Use the Earth Hour tracker to find an event near you or add your own to the map.

Today’s resource for deepening this message is the White Earth Land Recovery Project, an organization founded by Winona LaDuke that aims to reclaim the original land base of the White Earth Indian Reservation and preserve original land practices and stewardship. Explore their website and Native Harvest, their online store.

p.s. If you are not American Indian or First Nations, educate yourself and your loved ones about how Indigenous peoples around the globe are at the frontlines of climate change and are leading struggles for climate justice. Two great places to start are the Indigenous Environmental Network and Idle No More.

Commit2Respond’s Climate Justice Month intends to take you through a transformative spiritual process leading to long-term commitments to climate justice. At the end of the month you will be asked to SHIFT to a low carbon future, ADVANCE human rights, and GROW the movement. Learn more and start thinking about how you will #commit2respond to climate change.

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Commit2Respond Day 5: The Pond

In support of the 30 Days of Love/Commit2Respond – Climate Justice

Day 5

I live in the woods on a pond with my husband and young son and two dogs and dozens of other species above and below and all around us.

More than 100 years ago, a group of wealthy white men started a pit mine in these ancient woods. They dug for months, pulling stones rich in iron ore out of vulnerable Earth. Once they left, our Mother began to heal herself, to transform destruction into an opportunity for life-giving, filling the vacant space with rain. With the water came the deer who drink and the turtles who swim and the groundhogs who dig and the birds who hunt. There are fish in our pond now and wild blue heron who stand as still as the ancient trees who have survived too many violations, the trees who bear witness to the fragility and the regeneration of the forest.

And in the woods is my family, living gently on the edge of the pond, grateful to Earth that we can be part of this living body and knowing our job now is to be lovers and fierce protectors of all the life that blossoms here.

As we enter Climate Justice Month, may we all be lovers and protectors of life.

Rev. Peggy Clarke is the Minister at the First Unitarian Society of Westchester in Hastings, NY. She is also the Racial and Social Justice Consultant for the UUA Metro New York District and on the Steering Committees for the Green Sanctuary Program, UU Environmental Justice Collaboratory, and Commit2Respond, as well as the chair of Food Justice Ministry. She is also a Senior GreenFaith Fellow.

Today’s practice is to talk with a loved one about how you are a lover and protector of the Earth, or share on the Commit2Respond Facebook page or elsewhere on social media using the hashtag #commit2respond how you have acted to love and protect the Earth.

Today’s resource for deepening this message are two powerful short videos from Sustainable Human that show how wolves and whales, respectively, are “ecosystem engineers.” Rejoice in the truly awesome power of all creation’s interdependence as breathtakingly showcased by the Earth’s ecosystems: “Wolves Change Rivers” and “How Whales Change Climate.

Commit2Respond’s Climate Justice Month intends to take you through a transformative spiritual process leading to long-term commitments to climate justice. At the end of the month you will be asked to SHIFT to a low carbon future, ADVANCE human rights, and GROW the movement. Learn more and start thinking about how you will #commit2respond to climate change.

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Commit2Respond Day 4: The Common Good

In support of the 30 Days of Love/Commit2Respond – Climate Justice

Day 4

We breathe the common wind of the earth
no matter where we live, who we love,
what language we speak.

We drink the common water of the earth
no matter our skin color, how long we live,
the coverings we drape on our forms.

We follow the common paths of the earth
no matter our beliefs, how far we move from home,
the gold that we carry, or its lack.

May we live from these truths:
our hearts open to the holiness all around us,
and our hands turned always toward the common good.

Rev. Kathleen McTigue is the Director of the UU College of Social Justice and serves on the Commit2Respond Steering Committee.

Today’s practice is to reflect on what “the common good” means to you as a person of faith and/or conscience. How are you called by your beliefs or by that which is greater than yourself to act on the common good, and what does that call require of you?

Today’s resource for deepening this message is the brief history of environmental justice recounted by the UU Environmental Justice Collaboratory on their new website. “Environmental justice” is a specific framework for working for change, grounded in “the common good.” Learn more from Robert Bullard in the 3-minute video “The Genesis of Environmental Justice.”

Commit2Respond’s Climate Justice Month intends to take you through a transformative spiritual process leading to long-term commitments to climate justice. At the end of the month you will be asked to SHIFT to a low carbon future, ADVANCE human rights, and GROW the movement. Learn more and start thinking about how you will #commit2respond to climate change.

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Commit2Respond Day 3: Bless the World

In support of the 30 Days of Love/Commit2Respond – Climate Justice

Day 3

April, just around the corner, is planting month in my backyard garden—time to transplant the kale and broccoli seedlings that sprouted indoors, back when the snow outside reached almost to the top of the fence. (I live near Boston!) This is both a spiritual and an ecological practice, a time to remind myself of how deeply symbiotic I am, not only with the kale and broccoli but also with the earthworms that bring air into the soil, the bacteria that fix nitrogen in it, and the birds that will share the garden’s bounty throughout the year ahead. Gardening is also a reminder of my own power, as Rebecca Parker puts it, to bless or to curse the world.
Just as every breath I take emits carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, every plant that I nurture absorbs that carbon back into its own substance and eventually—if I compost it properly!—returns it to the soil. On a larger scale, agriculture currently accounts for one third of all greenhouse emissions, largely because of the depletion of topsoil, the use of fossil-fuel powered machinery, and the emission of methane by livestock. But agriculture can also be a place of earth healing when farmers see renewed topsoil as their primary crop, when they welcome wild plants and animals as full citizens of the farm community, when they plant windmills amid their cornfields and harvest methane as well as milk from their herds. Those of us who are not farmers can participate in this healing by purchasing local and organic food, by advocating for farm policies that support climate-friendly practices, and by blessing our own backyard or community gardens, one seed at a time.

Dan McKannan is Ralph Waldo Emerson Professor of Unitarian Universalism at Harvard Divinity School.

Today’s practice is to plant some seeds or seedlings. Start some herbs growing in your kitchen or a container garden. Rejoice in the magic of a single seed.

Today’s resource for deepening this message is the story of the UU Church of Akron, OH, and their food justice ministry combining ethical eating, community gardening, food education, and addressing hunger. Part of shifting to a low carbon future is increasing everyone’s access to healthy, local produce, particularly within low-income communities. Get inspired by stories from Akron, OH, and also groups like Shining Light Garden Foundation.

Commit2Respond’s Climate Justice Month intends to take you through a transformative spiritual process leading to long-term commitments to climate justice. At the end of the month you will be asked to SHIFT to a low carbon future, ADVANCE human rights, and GROW the movement. Learn more and start thinking about how you will #commit2respond to climate change.

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Commit2Respond Day 2: The Elixir of Life

In support of the 30 Days of Love/Commit2Respond – Climate Justice

Day 2

I read somewhere that at least half of all the poems that have appeared in The New Yorker contain some image related to water. It’s true of the most recent issue I’m looking at: two poems are published in it, one of which is entitled “An Essay on Clouds.”

For a while I found this peculiar. But the more I thought about the plethora of water images, the more sense it made. Much of the known universe exists without water. But life can’t. Not just human life but any form of life as we know it. There’s nothing more fundamental to life than water. And that’s why water has always been such a sacred religious symbol—of breath, of purity, of abundance.

We know this deep inside ourselves. We know that up to sixty percent of our bodies are water. We know that all that is naturally green around us is green because of water. We know that when we thirst, we thirst at the most basic level for water. We know that we and the earth will die without it.

But we forget all that because in the developed world it usually appears before us so effortlessly. We hardly sense how at risk it—and we—are. The very elixir of life at enormous risk of scarcity, toxicity. Time to reclaim the fundamentals. Time to wash ourselves of our indolence. Time to refresh our devotion. Time to cherish that without which little we love would be.

Rev. Dr. William F. Schulz is President of the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee.

Today’s practice is to consider how water sustains your life. Engage in a Water Appreciation (from wizdUUm.net) or find some other way to cultivate mindfulness and gratitude for water.

Today’s resource for deepening this message is the Blue Buckets Campaign from the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, part of Climate Justice Sunday.

Commit2Respond’s Climate Justice Month intends to take you through a transformative spiritual process leading to long-term commitments to climate justice. At the end of the month you will be asked to SHIFT to a low carbon future, ADVANCE human rights, and GROW the movement. Learn more and start thinking about how you will #commit2respond to climate change.

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